If you’re having a summer party, make these cocktails by the pitcher – East Bay Times

With the onset of warm weather, cocktails in bulk can help make gatherings delicious and easy. Whether it’s under the stars, sitting by the pool, or happily gathering around the table on the patio, backyard bartenders can relax when entertaining outdoors.

Cold. Pour. cheers.

A wide range of pre-made drinks are served from a large cold jug. Depending on the ingredients, most work can be done hours or even days in advance. So, there’s no last-minute shake-up in the cocktail shaker. Don’t try to remember ingredients and proportions. No pressure.

Along with a large chilled jug, I like to make an easy-to-reach tray with cups and a filled ice bucket. I often use stemless wine glasses or small old-fashioned goblets, keeping the serving size on the moderate side. do not dissolve in my house; I want guests to remember dinner.

My table display also includes non-alcoholic options. Some chilled sparkling water and fresh juice is a must. And if I have many guests who prefer nonalcoholic cocktails, I’d love to make a modified version of cookbook author Maggie Hoffman’s large Blaylocks collection.

To make, up to 2 hours in advance, combine 4 1/2 cups fresh pink grapefruit juice and 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice in a 2-quart pitcher. Add 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons of honey syrup made in a 2:1 ratio (Mix 1 1/4 cups honey and 3/4 cup warm water in a saucepan and cook over medium heat, stirring until combined, do not boil – cool.) To serve, pour ½ cup in tall glasses filled with ice. Add sparkling water to the top.

Boulevards, a drink developed in Paris in the 1920s, is made with rye or bourbon, Campari and sweet vermouth. (Courtesy of American Test Kitchen)

Big-Batch Boulevardiers

Boulevard has its origins in Paris in the 1920s. American expat Erskine Gwen is credited with inventing the delicious concoction, giving it a name that honors those who frequent Parisian boulevards. The cocktail can be thought of as either a variant of Bittersweet Manhattan or Negroni whiskey (you can think of Negroni as a variation of the Boulevardier, because Boulevardiers appeared in print long before Negroni).

According to America’s Test Kitchen book “How to Cocktail,” the cocktail originally called for equal parts bourbon or rye, Campari, and sweet Vermouth. But when they put their version together, they concluded that a lower proportion of Campari allows the drink to walk a fine line between bitter and sweet, while maintaining a rich fecundity. They noted that because water was added to the mixture, no ice was needed. Water ensures the perfect amount of dilution.

fruit: 8 cocktails

Ingredients

12 ounces rye or bourbon

8 oz Campari

8 ounces sweet vermouth

8 ounces water

Appetizer: 8 orange rolls, see cook notes

Procedure

Cook’s Notes: To make the citrus flavor, use a paring knife or a rotating blade vegetable peeler to remove a wide, long strip of peel. Try not to take too much white pulp with the colored part of the peel.

1. Combine rye, Campari, vermouth, and water in a serving pitcher or large bowl. Cover the mixture and place it in the refrigerator to chill well, at least 2 hours.

2. Stir to reassemble, then serve in chilled cocktail glasses, garnishing each cocktail with a touch of orange. A large batch of Boulevards may be refrigerated for up to 1 month, airtight.

source: ‘How to Cocktail’ from America’s Test Kitchen (America’s Test Kitchen, $24.99)

Through experiments to find the best sangria recipe, the experts at America's Test Kitchen settled on a simple method, using only fruity red wine, orange liquor, simple syrup and slices of orange and lemon.  (Courtesy of American Test Kitchen)
Through experiments to find the best sangria recipe, the experts at America’s Test Kitchen settled on a simple method, using only fruity red wine, orange liquor, simple syrup and slices of orange and lemon. (Courtesy of American Test Kitchen)

Classic Red Wine Sangria

Sangria, with its ancient roots in Spain, has become a staple drink for parties all over the world. The people in America’s Test Kitchen decided, after much experimentation, that they preferred a simple formula. They tested versions with endless combinations of fruit and settled on this classic red wine that includes simple citruses – just oranges and lemons.

For Sangria based on white wine, they preferred to add apples or pears. For the rose-based version, they suggest two cups of fresh mixed berries. Recipes for these variations appear at the end of the Classic Sangria recipe.

fruit: 12 cocktails

Ingredients

2 bottles (750 ml) of red wine with fruit, such as merlot

4 ounces orange liqueur, such as Grand Marnier

4 ounces simple syrup, see chef’s notes

3 oranges (2 thinly sliced, 1 juiced to make 4 ounces)

2 lemons, thinly sliced

To serve: snow

Cook’s Notes: To make a simple syrup, mix 3/4 cup of granulated sugar and 5 ounces of warm tap water in a bowl. Whisk until the sugar dissolves. Cool completely, about 10 minutes, before transferring to an airtight container. You can also buy simple syrup in many supermarkets in the liquor section.

Procedure

1. Mix all ingredients (except ice) in a serving pitcher or large bowl. Cover and refrigerate until flavors blend and mixture has cooled well, at least 2 hours or up to 8 hours.

2. Stir the sangria to reassemble, then serve in chilled wine glasses half filled with ice, garnishing individual portions with marinated fruit.

Differences:

Sangria white wine: Replace white wine with fruit, such as Riesling for red wine, brandy for orange liqueur, 8-ounce apple juice for orange juice, and 2 apples or pears — thinly sliced ​​— for orange and lemon slices.

Rosie Sangria: Replace the rose wine for red wine, Elderflower orange liqueur, 8 ounces of pomegranate juice for the orange juice, and 2 cups of the berry mixture for the orange and lemon slices.

source: ‘How To Cocktail’ from America’s Test Kitchen (America’s Test Kitchen, $24.99)

The Birds Again cocktail is a refreshing infusion that combines sauvignon blanc and dry herb with basil, simple syrup, rose water and fresh lemon juice.  (Photo by Kelly Beaulieu, courtesy of Ten Speed ​​Press)
The Birds Again cocktail is a refreshing infusion that combines sauvignon blanc and dry herb with basil, simple syrup, rose water and fresh lemon juice. (Photo by Kelly Beaulieu, courtesy of Ten Speed ​​Press)

birds again

In Maggie Hoffman’s book, “Batch Cocktails” (Ten Speed ​​Press, $19.99), offers a formula for Birds Again cocktails in bulk, a refreshing infusion that combines sauvignon blanc and dry herbal wort with basil, simple syrup, rosewater, and lemon juice. Fresh. The author notes that it’s a bright, refreshing blend that’s an “easy, low-grade drinker.”

She suggests a good way to use up leftover dry vermouth on a hot day is to combine several ounces of it in a tall glass filled with ice with twice the amount of tonic and a lemon wedge.

fruit: about 13 servings

Ingredients

15 fresh basil leaves, torn in half

1 cup plus 2 tablespoons (1: 1) simple syrup; See the chef’s notes

1 1/4 teaspoon rose water. See the chef’s notes

2 1/4 cups chilled sauvignon blanc

2 1/4 cups dry vermouth, such as Doolin

1 cup plus 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

ice

Appetizer: 13 fresh basil leaves

Optional accessories: Freshly ground black pepper

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